About us

Four European organisations cooperate in the project: Prague Botanical Garden (Czechia), Gothenburg Botanical Garden (Sweden), the Adam Mickiewicz University Botanical Garden (Poland) and Magyar Arborétumok és Botanikus kertek Szövetsége (Hungary).

People involved

My name is…
Jarmila Skružná
Why did I join the project?
I have worked on the topic of botanical gardens accessible to all visitors regardless of their potential hancicap since 1996. Sharing and improving our long-time experience with the international project team was a logical outcome of our work.
What do I like the most about the project?
Creative and friendly atmosphere, common interest, influences and inspirations, joint activities
I work for…
Prague Botanical Garden as the heat of the ethnobotany section and manager of the international project team. I am a curator of useful plants collection and I co-operate with the educators in creating various activities. I also research archeobotany of monastery gardens.
I studied…
Faculty of Science, Charles University
Medicinal plants course at Farmaceutical faculty, Charles University
My name is…
Klára Lorencová
Why did I join the project?
There is an endless potential for grasping the fascinating world of plants using all senses in the botanical garden. I would like to support this in practice and bring the visitors nice experience and knowledge.
What do I like the most about the project?
I first thought that it is aimed on much more narrow spectre of visitors. However, soon it emerged that it can be beneficial for everyone. I like to travel and get to know our wonderful colleague from the partner organizations.
I work for…
Prague Botanical Garden
I studied…
Institute of Tropics and Subtropics, Czech University of Life Sciences
My name is…
Eva Novozámská
Why did I join the project?
The problematics of making the garden accessible is very important for education. It does not make a difference if we try to pass experiences and information to children, seniors or people with special needs. Thanks to the project I can get to know new things, interesting people and be inspired.
What do I like the most about the project?
The diversity of activities I do and of the people I meet.
I work for…
Prague Botanical Garden
I studied…
Faculty of Science, Charles University
My name is…
Iva Vilhumová
Why did I join the project?
I worked at the Prague Zoo, where I was preparing programmes for people with sight impairment. With my colleagues from the botanical garden I cooperated on the exhibitions for all senses.
What do I like the most about the project?
The international scope and the fact that nice people are everywhere. 🙂
I work for…
Prague Botanical Garden as an externist.
I studied…
Faculty of Science, Charles University
My name is…
Tomáš Kebert
Why did I join the project?
I worked in Prague Botanical Garden when the project team needed extension. Through time I realized that joining the project is rather a beneficial affair.
What do I like the most about the project?
Meeting new people and expanding my awareness. Taking part in a matter of almost global influence, complementing the team in various ways.
I work for…
Basic school Radotín.
I studied…
Teaching of biology and chemistry, Faculty of Pedagogy, Charles University
My name is
Roksana Lubkowska.
Why did I join the project?
I worked in the Botanical Garden of Adam Mickiewicz University as an educator when the opportunity to take part in the project appeared. Its goals were related to my work and allowed to acquire new skills.
What do I like most about the project?
The most valuable for me was the exchange of experience and ideas with other project participants. Some of them even enthused showing that thanks to eagerness and perseverance, extraordinary ideas can be realized.
I work for
The Natural and Forest Education Centre Dziewicza Góra, State Forests.
I studied
Environmental Protection and Biology – Teaching Natural Science, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań
My name is
Joanna Markiewicz
Why did I join the project?
As an educator of the Botanical Garden I also have classes with groups of people with disabilities. I wanted to learn the methods of work with this kind of people in other nature education centers.
What do I like the most about the project?
I met interesting people, visited beautiful botanical gardens and other inspiring places. I got acquainted with the methods of working with people with special needs both in Poland and abroad
I work for
Botanical Garden of the University of Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań
I studied
Environmental Protection, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań
My name is
Alicja Kolasińska
Why did I join the project?
I joined the project because I replaced my colleague Roksana who had to leave. I am responsible for organizing exhibitions in the AMU BG, so in addition to the support of my team, I am responsible for organizing the exhibition for all senses “Never Alone – Secrets of Symbiosis” during the conference.
What do I like the most about the project?
I broaden my knowledge about the role of botanical gardens for people with special needs. Our work influences on raising public awareness about these problems.
I work for
Botanical Garden of Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań
I studied
Faculty of Biology, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań
My name is
Helen EkvallWhy did I join the project?
To learn more about how to work with accessibility and how to open up green spaces to make them more accessible and enjoyable for everyone.

What do I like the most about the project?
Sharing experiences and knowledge with colleagues from different countries in Europe. The project has helped me see and understand how barriers affect experiences and has motivated me and given me new insight which will enable us to work towards a more inclusive approach.

I work for
Gothenburg Botanical Garden Sweden

I studied
Biology and education and am particularly interested in experiential learning outdoors.

My name is
Eva-Lena LarssonWhy did I join the project?
It was a good opportunity to learn more about the subject and to reach outside our own garden.

What do I like the most about the project?
Learning about how other Botanical Gardens/countries work with accessibility for people with special needs and to meet colleges from other gardens in Europe. Understanding the differences and the similarities between us.

I work for
Gothenburg Botanical Garden

I studied
Biology PhD in plant ecology

My name is Kennert Danielsson

Together with my colleagues at the Gothenburg botanical garden I joined the project to get to cooperate on developing methods to make the garden more inclusive and more inspirational to all visitors.

I have enjoyed seeing the other gardens and become very inspired by their work. A lot of ideas and thoughts have come up along the way, and I feel inspired to work further on the concept of inclusiveness and accessibility.

I studied biology and geoscience and worked for several years as an outdoor and museum educator, before studying adult education. I want to inspire garden visitors to all-sense experiences.

My name is Karen Otto and I have been working as an educator at the Botanical garden in Göteborg since 2015. Previously, I studied biology, took a PhD in microbiology and spent several years with research and teaching in higher education. While teaching at the university, I developed a deeper interest in pedagogy and I am currently rounding off my education with a Master in didactics. One of the most striking differences between my current work and my work at the university is the great diversity of people I meet – our students and visitors differ in age, social and cultural background and their level of ability. When I joined the project at the second international meeting I was immediately taken by the positive and open atmosphere in the team. I like the challenge that comes from the insight that improved accessibility means a better educational approach in general. People who do not fit into the norm can help us to develop creative solutions that welcome everybody.

Institutions involved

 

Prague Botanical GardenPrague_lg_lg-barevne

www.botanicka.cz

 

 

Gothenburg Botanical GardenUtskrift

www.botaniska.se

The area in total is 175 hectares (ca 430 acres), of which most constitutes a nature reserve including the arboretum. The garden proper is about 40 hectars and here grow something like 16,000 different species and cultivars in various parts of it. Among many fascinating parts of the garden are The Rhododendron Valley, The Japanese Glade and The Rockgarden with it’s waterfall. In the Greenhouses you will find about 4,000 various species and cultivars, including some 1,500 orchids, a remarkable travertine department and the rare Eastern Island Tree.

 

Adam Mickiewicz University Botanical GardenPoland_Logo_OB_UAM

www.obuam.robia.pl

The AMU Botanical Garden, established in 1925, is nowadays a research and education unit associated with the Faculty of Biology of the Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań. Currently it occupies an area of approximately 22 ha inhabited by about 7000 plant taxa from almost all Earth’s climate zones. The plant collection, divided into 10 thematic sections, serves mostly scientific, didactic and educational purposes. The Alpine Garden is the highlight of the Garden. At present, our research is focused on protecting rare and endangered species. The Exhibition and Education Centre, located in the centre of the park, is a place where expositions and meetings open to the public are organized throughout the whole year.

 

Magyar Arborétumok és Botanikus kertek Szövetsége

www.mabotkertek.hu

site_logo8_enThe Hungarian Association of Arboreta and Botanic Gardens (HAABG) is a non-profit civil organization. It was founded in 1992, following the transition of the political regime in Hungary. In addition to its 46 member institutions it can boast with some 100 professionals among its members. Member gardens of HAABG c

over altogether more than 1000 hectares where they house some 20 000 native and exotic plant species/varieties in their field and

greenhouse collections. Almost 70 % (483 species) of native plant species protected by Hungarian law are on display and/or involved in conservation activities in at least one of our member institutions by doing so they play a key role in the ex situ conservation of protected/endangered species. Furthermore, 80 % of our member gardens themselves are nature conservation areas, as well. It assists education as well as environmental education and getting to know the world of plants. Besides the seasonal change in the appearance of the vegetation our gardens offer a regular and ever extending range of programmes (technical guided tours, lectures, concerts, exhibitions) to visitors and provide a pleasant recreational environment both for young and old.

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